Now even Al Qaeda tells Ahmadinejad to stop the conspiracy theories blaming the U.S. for 9/11

Iranian president called it 'the September 11 mystery'
By Chris Parsons
Ridiculous: Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has been told to stop his conspiracy theories about 9/11
Ridiculous: Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has been told to stop his conspiracy theories about 9/11
Outspoken controversial Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has been told by Al-Qaeda to stop his conspiracy theories claiming that the U.S. was to blame for the 9/11 attacks.
The terrorist organisation has reportedly sent a message to the Iranian president asking him to stop spreading his 'ridiculous belief' about the 2001 attacks which killed nearly 3,000 people.
According to the Guardian, Iranian media reported on Wednesday quotes from Al-Qaeda's English language magazine, criticising Ahmadinejad's latest comments.
The Iranian leader caused a U.S. delegation to walk out of his UN general assembly speech last week when he cast doubt over the official version of the 2001 attacks by referring to 9/11 as a 'mystery'.
Delegates from several other countries, including Israel Ireland and Fiji, also walked out of the speech while Ahmadinejad was still talking.
According to Iranian media, the article in Inspire said: 'The Iranian government has professed on the tongue of its president Ahmadinejad that it does not believe that Al-Qaeda was behind 9/11 but rather, the US government.
'So we may ask the question: why would Iran ascribe to such a ridiculous belief that stands in the face of all logic and evidence?'
The Guardian reported that the Al-Qaeda article insisted it was behind the terror attacks, before criticising Ahmadinejad for discrediting the terrorist group.
The Iranian president's controversial speech prompted a walkout by many in the UN last week
The Iranian president's controversial speech prompted a walkout by many in the UN last week
One protester outside the UN general assembly last week dressed as a clown wore a mask of Ahmadinejad in a red nose
One protester outside the UN general assembly last week dressed as a clown wore a mask of Ahmadinejad in a red nose
The Inspire article continued: 'For them, Al-Qaeda was a competitor for the hearts and minds of the disenfranchised Muslims around the world. Al-Qaeda... succeeded in what Iran couldn't.
'Therefore it was necessary for the Iranians to discredit 9/11 and what better way to do so? Conspiracy theories.'
Publication: Inspire, the Al-Qaeda English language magazine, said the Iranian president's comments were 'ridiculous'
Publication: Inspire, the Al-Qaeda English language magazine, said the Iranian president's comments were 'ridiculous'
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad had outraged the UN last week by calling the 9/11 attack on the U.S. 'a mystery' shortly after the 10th anniversary of the atrocity.
In a speech full of questions which were no more than thinly veiled attacks on the U.S. he asked the UN who had used the 'mysterious September 11 incident' as a precursor to war and to dominate the Middle East?
He added: 'By using their imperialistic media network which is under the influence of colonialism they threaten anyone who questions the Holocaust and the September 11 event with sanctions and military actions,' he said.
When the idea of an independent fact-finding investigation of 'the hidden elements' involved in the attacks was raised last year, he said, 'my country and myself came under pressure and threat by the government of the United States.'
'Instead of assigning a fact-finding team, they killed the main perpetrator and threw his body into the sea,' Ahmadinejad said, referring to the U.S. military's killing of Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden in early May.
Controversy: Mahmoud Ahmadinejad caused outrage by referring to the 9/11 attacks as 'the September 11 mystery'
Controversy: Mahmoud Ahmadinejad caused outrage by referring to the 9/11 attacks as 'the September 11 mystery'
'Would it not have been reasonable to bring to justice and openly to trial the main perpetrator of the incident in order to identify the elements behind the safe space provided for the invading aircraft to attack the twin world trade towers?,' he asked.
No stranger to outrageous comments, Ahmadinejad began his speech by highlighting the plight of the world's poorest nations, but included the U.S. in that by saying the country suffered from 'inequality'.
Ahmadinejad then cryptically said this year he planned 'to analyse the current [global] situation from a different angle'.
He then went on to single out a regular target of his, blaming Zionism for the wars in the Korean peninsula and Vietnam.
 
 
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